Wild foods hike : part

I meant to post this earlier, but here I am now.  A couple of weekends ago, we went out to the Oregon coast range to gather some wild foods.  To learn new plants and enjoy another fun day with folks from Cascadia Wild. It was a lot of fun.

It was a rainy day, after a week of sunshine.  But not too cold, except after falling into the muddy creek not once, twice, but three times.

Before photo.

After photo.

As I was falling (one of the times) I grabbed Devil’s Club trying to save myself from falling into the muck and ending up with my hand filled with spines for few days.  It hurt and bothered me for about a week, but it reminded me of the hike. It was a great hike after all.

Devil’s Club.

These are the spines.

But there was much more nature than that.

Trillium.

Oxalis or wood sorrel.  Edible.

Miner’s Lettuce.  Edible.

Miner’s Lettuce.

Bed-straw.

More Devil’s Club.

Elderberry.

Muck.

Cutie 1.

Horsetail.

Cutie 2.

Bushwacking.

Oh, how I love Oregon.  All this green, all the plants, moss, the water.  I love it!

Salmonberry.

Solomon’s Seal. Not edible.

Red Huckleberry.

Fairy Bells. A type of lily.

Sweet Cicely.  Edible leaves.

And so much more.  I’m going with another post for tomorrow, because I have too many pictures of this beautiful day.  Hope you are enjoying it.  Tomorrow, part 2.  Have a good day.

Note: Please. PLEASE! Always know which plant you are picking before you eat it.  My notes here are just that. Notes and pretty pictures.  They are NOT meant to be a field guide by any means. I am just learning, and I would not want you to eat the wrong plant and get ill.  Take a field guide.  Better yet, go out with someone you know, who knows about wild plants.  As we did. We shared notes, knowledge, and me, especially, am just starting to learn about wild plants. So please, PLEASE ALWAYS BE SAFE FIRST. 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Wild foods hike : part

  1. Erik D. June 8, 2014 / 7:41 pm

    In the picture (below which has the caption “Oh, how I love Oregon. All this green, all the plants, moss, the water. I love it!”) with the stump that has a tall slender cavity in it there is a plant with a heart shaped leaf. It look a little bit similar to miners lettuce but is definitely a different plant. Do you know what this is? We have a large patch of it growing in our back yard here on the coast and haven’t been able to identify it.
    Looks like your hike was fun and eventful. What you called ‘devils club’, is that another name for stinging nettle?

    • NaturallyFunDays : Marcela June 8, 2014 / 10:00 pm

      Hi Erik. Let’s see. In that picture with the stump you mention, there is an ivy type plant (with heart shaped leaves) but there’s also a ground cover with heart-shaped leaves that look almost like a large clover. It is oxalis a wood sorrel. Look on a field guide and see if that’s what it is.
      Devils club is a bigger plant than stinging nettle. I don’t know if it is edible, but stinging nettle is (I have a few posts on that). And yes, stinging nettle does sting, but it’s very different than the little needles from devils club.

      As always make sure you identify correctly your plants before eating them. We had a great trip, and we missed going this year. Thanks for visiting.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s